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Australia's Northern Territory launches aeromagnetic survey program to find gold, copper and nickel and rare earth minerals

Australia's Northern Territory launches aeromagnetic survey program to find gold, copper and nickel and rare earth minerals
Issue Time:2018-08-28
According to Mining Weekly, the Northern Territory Government of Australia has launched an important aeronautical exploration program in the desert of Tanami, which is part of the Northern Territory Government's $26 million mineral exploration investment plan.


The geophysical exploration program is one of the largest of its kind in the history of the region, and the data collected helps exploration companies find mineral deposits to create jobs in the Northern Territory.


Ken Vowles, Northern Territory Resources and Primary Industries Minister, said that creating jobs for the local community is the primary goal of the Northern Territory government. This is also the main purpose of investing A$26 million in mineral exploration, and is the largest in the history of the Northern Territory Government to support the exploration industry. The government will build Tennant Creek into a mining service center, which is also a prime gold production base in the Northern Territory.


Wals believes that gold contributes a lot to the Northern Territory's economy and indigenous communities. The discovery of new deposits in this area is not easy. The data obtained from this material detection can help exploration companies find gold mines, as well as other minerals such as copper, nickel and rare earth metals.


Wals stressed that the Northern Territory will open up new areas for exploration, reduce investment risks, and strive to be the preferred investment destination for investors.


The detection of this object was completed by the Northern Territory Government in cooperation with three private companies. The work area is located in the Ta Nam Desert, 300 kilometers west of Tengnan Creek. There are two working aircrafts with a flight distance of 275,000 kilometers.


The aircraft will be equipped with a magnetometer that captures the subtle changes in the magnetic field of the earth's magnetic field, allowing geologists to "see" the distribution of underground rocks.


The data obtained from aeromagnetic measurements will be released to the public five months later.